Disney CEO: Hackers claim to have stolen upcoming film

Geoffrey Rush Johnny Depp Javier Bardem and Orlando Bloom

Geoffrey Rush Johnny Depp Javier Bardem and Orlando Bloom

According to reports, Disney is refusing to pay anything to the hackers.

To carry out their threat, the hackers would release five minutes of the film initially online, before uploading 20-minute chunks until the point where their extortion demands are met. Disney's CEO Bob Iger has confirmed the hack, but he has refused to name the movie being held for ransom.

Disney Chairman Bob Iger released on Monday that pirates of the digital wave had claimed that they have access to a Disney film.

Mr Iger said that the corporation will not pay the group, which is threatening to post it online in segments ahead of its global release later in this month. Johnny Depp is not due to make his return as Captain Jack Sparrow until 25th May.

Pirates of the Caribbean 5, subtitled Dead Men Tell No Tales in the U.S. and Salazar's Revenge elsewhere (including the UK), is set for release next week, May 26.

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Logano's Ford then turned hard left and went straight into the left rear of Patrick's No. 10. She also crashed out of the season-opening Daytona 500 and had engine trouble at Las Vegas.

Remember when hackers threatened to released season 3 of Orange is the New Black two weeks ago? Netflix apparently didn't budge either, and ten episodes of the still-unreleased 5th season of "Orange Is the New Black" were released on the Pirate Bay last month. According to Deadline, the hackers have demanded, "an enormous amount of money be paid to Bitcoin".

Netflix declined to pay any ransom and the shows were subsequently leaked online.

Now, we know that the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise is all about stealing the treasure, searching for the gold, drinking rum and holding things for ransom.

Just a few weeks ago, 10 episodes of the new season of "Orange is the New Black" - originally meant to launch on June 9 - were posted on 'The Pirate Bay.' Netflix had refused to pay an undisclosed ransom price.