definitions - Why does it mean both? & quot; to know & quot; and & quot; to taste & quot ;? - Spanish Language Stack Exchange

definitions - Why does it mean both? & quot; to know & quot; and & quot; to taste & quot ;? - Spanish Language Stack Exchange

definitions - Why does it mean both? & quot; to know & quot; and & quot; to taste & quot ;? - Spanish Language Stack Exchange

The two "knowledge" (the taste and the wisdom) have a common past. The original "knowledge" is that of taste. He derived the second meaning by a metaphor in Latin that also appears in other languages. The Latin word "sapere" seems to come from the very ancient Proto-Indo-European root sap. Sapere originally referred to "to perceive", "to smell", as in expressions Spanish words such as "this smells like a trap". But its main use in vulgar Latin was the one that remained in the Spanish words "flavor", "tasty", "to taste", "tasteless", "remabio", "desabrido" and "sorrows", meaning, taste.

By a strange but seemingly frequent conceptual metaphor, the "knowing" of feeling the was used to refer to more spiritual matters, just as we use the senses of the nervous system in expressions like "this designer has very good taste" , "me liked much your book" > "They like" , "tell it with touch" and is > "visionary" .

UK - Constanca Cabral
Everything in the picture above has come from charity shops, table included, and is a good sample of what things interest me. Sometimes it only takes me two minutes but on certain days I can spend hours looking at books (always sorted out by themes).

Then "knowledge" first has a connotation and then a meaning related to the intellectual capacity of perception, something similar to "sense common". From here comes the other family of Spanish words: "wisdom", "wise", "wise", "know", "smarty". In addition, of course, there is our dear species: "Homo sapiens" .

And one last subject: both verbs are conjugated in the same way.

p> You know how to read very well.

You know how to mint.;)

I know how to speak German. >