The paramo - long version - StudySpanish.com

The Paramo

The "paramo" is an ecological zone found only in the Andes. It begins at about 11,000 feet, where the temperate forests dwindle, and up to 16,000 feet, where the glaciers begin. The ground cover is dominated by hardy grasses, small shrubs and bushes. These plants survive by hugging the ground and sending roots deep into the dark peat as they are subjected to cold winds, fog and occasional night frosts. They have evolved thick waxy leaves studded with fine hairs to protect them from these extremes of weather, as well as from the unfiltered ultraviolet radiation of the equatorial sun.

The cushion plant is low, rounded and smooth leafed. It looks soft enough to sit on and it provides a comfortable respite for the tired hiker. The prevalent grass known as "pajonal" is used by the indigenous people to make thatched roofs for their dwellings. The "paper tree" - named for its papery bark, is considered one of the world's highest growing tree species. A hiker struggling through a dense stand of these spindly, twisted trees feels like an ant trying to negotiate an unmown lawn.

While visitors thrill to the sight of the Andean condor with it's 10-foot wingspan, many are surprised to discover the several varieties of hummingbirds that survive and even thrive in this stark land. Their special energy saving adaptation is to enter a state of deep torpor by significantly lowering their body temperature and slowing their metabolism in order to harden the frigid nights. Llamas, vicunas and alpacas, after having been eradicated in the wild, have been reintroduced to the páramo and it is not unusual to see them dotting the hillsides.

Campanula poscharskyana - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Plants can be grown from stem cuttings or from root division. are edible throughout the year, and can be put into salads. Cultivation and Uses It develops outdoors during summers with shorter nights , with more light bring more flowers.

The moor

The moor is an ecological zone of the Andes. It begins at about 3,400 meters, where the temperate forests begin to scarce, and reaches 4,900 meters, where the glaciers begin. The ground is covered with hardy grasses and shrubs. The plants, subject to cold winds, night frost and fog, survive by staying close to the earth and sending their roots deep into the peat. They have developed thick waxy leaves studded with fine hairs that protect them from environmental extremes and ultraviolet radiation from the equatorial sun.

The "cushion plant" is low, rounded and smooth leaves. It seems so soft as to sit on it, and indeed, provides a comfortable rest for the tired walker. A common grass, known as "pajonal", is used by the natives to make the roofs of their dwellings. The "paper tree", named for the consistency of its bark, is considered one of the tallest tree species to grow. The hiker who tries to traverse a group of these lanky, crooked trees feels like an ant running through an uncut lawn.

While visitors are amazed to see the Andean condor, whose outstretched wings measure more than 3 meters, many are surprised to discover the varieties of hummingbirds that survive and even thrive in this desolate land. These small birds save energy by entering a deep lethargy by significantly reducing the temperature of their bodies and their metabolism to withstand the cold nights. The flames, vicuñas and alpacas, after having disappeared from the wilderness, have been reintroduced into the moor, and it is not at all uncommon to see them on the slopes of the hills.