IV North American Ornithological Conference

IV North American Ornithological Conference

IV North American Ornithological Conference

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HOME | CONTACT | Butterworth, E, W, Ducks Unlimited Canada, Edmonton, Canada, e_butterworth@ducks.ca
Slattery, S ,, Ducks Unlimited Canada, Stonewall, Canada, s_slattery@ducks.ca
Devito, K ,, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada, kevin.devito@ualberta.ca
Mack, G ,, Ducks Unlimited Canada, Edmonton, Canada, g_mack@ducks.ca < Forest, S ,, Ducks Unlimited Canada, Edmonton, Canada, s_forest@ducks.ca
Smith, K ,, Ducks Unlimited Canada, Edmonton, Canada, k_smith@ducks.ca
Armstrong, L ,, Ducks Unlimited Canada, Stonewall, Canada, l_armstrong@ducks.ca
Bidwell, M, T, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada, mark.bidwell@usask.ca

THE OTHER DUCK FACTORY: THE IMPORTANCE OF BOREAL WETLANDS TO WATERFOWL.

The western boreal forest is the second most important area where some species of ducks nest in North America. Despite its importance, we know little about these waterfowl and their habitat requirements in this vast but diverse area. Ducks Unlimited has been developing maps of the boreal region through the use of remote sensing since 1998. To date we have developed more than 19 different wetland classes, based on the Canadian Wetland Classification System. Hydrological research in the region indicates that there is a high degree of connectivity between wetland types and terrestrial formations. We are also monitoring aquatic birds to identify habitat use and how this use changes during the frost-free period (eg, nesting season, during plumage molting or their level of organization). Growing water demand due to drought, human population expansion and cumulative industrial impacts on the western boreal forest can affect wetlands and their waterbird populations. In order to conserve wetlands more effectively, we must take into account the large industrial expansion and lack of knowledge of the western boreal forest, as well as understanding how wetlands work within the landscape and how waterfowl use this habitat. In this article, we demonstrate how the integration of research studies is working to conserve wetlands on this land with constant changes.

Butterworth, E, W, Ducks Unlimited Canada, Edmonton, Canada, e_butterworth@ducks.ca
Slattery, S ,, Ducks Unlimited Canada, Stonewall, Canada, s_slattery@ducks.ca
Devito, K ,, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada, kevin.devito@ualberta.ca
Mack, G ,, Ducks Unlimited Canada, Edmonton, Canada, g_mack@ducks.ca < Forest, S ,, Ducks Unlimited Canada, Edmonton, Canada, s_forest@ducks.ca
Smith, K ,, Ducks Unlimited Canada, Edmonton, Canada, k_smith@ducks.ca
Armstrong, L ,, Ducks Unlimited Canada, Stonewall, Canada, l_armstrong@ducks.ca
Bidwell, M, T, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada, mark.bidwell@usask.ca THE OTHER DUCK FACTORY: THE IMPORTANCE OF BOREAL WETLANDS TO WATERFOWL.

The western boreal forest is the second most important area where some species of ducks nest in North America. Despite its importance, we know little about these waterfowl and their habitat requirements in this vast but diverse area. Ducks Unlimited has been developing maps of the boreal region through the use of remote sensing since 1998. To date we have developed more than 19 different wetland classes, based on the Canadian Wetland Classification System. Hydrological research in the region indicates that there is a high degree of connectivity between wetland types and terrestrial formations. We are also monitoring aquatic birds to identify habitat use and how this use changes during the frost-free period (eg, nesting season, during plumage molting or their level of organization). Growing water demand due to drought, human population expansion and cumulative industrial impacts on the western boreal forest can affect wetlands and their waterbird populations. In order to conserve wetlands more effectively, we must take into account the large industrial expansion and lack of knowledge of the western boreal forest, as well as understanding how wetlands work within the landscape and how waterfowl use this habitat. In this article, we show how the integration of research studies is working to conserve wetlands on this land with constant changes.