Nature Moncton Information Line: 2015-02-15

Scarlet Tanager in Torrington courtesy of Erica Seitz

Scarlet Tanager in Torrington courtesy of Erica Seitz

George Sinclair spotted a near completely white partial albino AMERICAN CROW [Corneille d'Amérique] on Highway 114 near the Penobske Baptist Church on Thursday, traveling with a Crow flock. It was only a few black feathers under the wing with black tail and eyes.

The crows are still making their large flock movements at dusk - Anne Marsch noticed a flock of approximately 500 heading in a westerly direction from the Point Park area on Saturday evening.

While on the Tantramar on Thursday, Brian Stone and I spotted 3 BARROW'S GOLDENEYE [Garrot d'Islande] in the same area that Kathleen Spicer photographed the Hybrid Goldeneye. In the one quick photo Brian was able to get: the 2 outside birds are adult female Barrow's Goldeneye showing the complete orange beak; the lad in the center is hard to call a male Goldeneye.

Brian Stone shares a few photos from the past few days to include the DUCK troupe at Mapleton Park waiting for a hand out, the french fry pile that had the GULLS in a tizzy in Macaan, NS, and a HORNED LARK [Alouette hausse-col] on the Tantramar. Brian's visit to Mapleton Park on Saturday found a male PILEATED WOODPECKER [Grand pic] that was very busy at his mission and ignoring folks on the trail.

Brian also photographed CIRCUMZENITHAL ARC with the sun on Saturday which Brian comments is the best that I have ever seen. He also got a solar halo. More on this astronomical event is on the attached website http://www.atoptics.co.uk/halo/cza.htm

Nature Moncton February 2015 Meeting
Tuesday, February 17 at 7.00 PM
Mapleton Park Rotary Lodge - The Monarch Butterfly - From Egg to Adult and Release Presenter - Rheal Vienneau

A significant amount of new information on this amazing creature has come to light thanks to uniquely numbered tags placed on adult butterflies in advance of their return to Mexico. When these tags are retrieved, it's possible to trace the butterfly's movements. Most of the adults tagged are netted in the wild, tagged, and then released.

Rhea Vienneau, however, has taken the conservation and tagging effort one step farther by learning how to to capture the females, letting them lay eggs on common milkweed and grows in their yard, releasing the adults after egg laying, taking the eggs into rearing units, and then tagging and releasing the new butterflies as they emerge. This has led to more Monarch Butterflies heading to Mexico all the way from Dieppe, New Brunswick to reach their over-wintering grounds.

On Tuesday, February 17, 2015 Rheal will demonstrate the process he goes through to contribute to this exemplary conservation effort.

#DIY - Flower of three colors #DIY - Flower of three colors - YouTube
From fabric flowers, tiaras, bracelets, necklaces, brooches, diadems, rings and all kinds of accessories and accessories. From cloth flowers, tiaras, bracelets, necklaces, brooches, diadems, rings and all kinds of accessories and accessories.

Rheal also raises and releases other moths and butterflies and will share his perfected methods. / p>

As always, any guests are welcome.

Nelson Poirier,
Moncton Nature

BARROWS GOLDENEYE DUCKS (FEMALES) ON RIGHT AND LEFT. FEB. 12, 2015. BRIAN STONE

CIRCUMZENITHAL ARC 03. FEB. 14, 2015. BRIAN STONE

DOWNY WOODPECKER. FEB. 14, 2015. BRIAN STONE

DUCK TROOP AT MAPLETON PARK. FEB. 14, 2015. BRIAN STONE

FRENCH FRY FEED PILE. FEB. 12, 2015. BRIAN STONE

HORNED LARK 02. FEB. 12, 2015. BRIAN STONE

PILEATED WOODPECKER. FEB. 14, 2015. BRIAN STONE