Natalio Hernández: Nahuatl poems / Poems in Nahuatl / In xochitl in cuicatl | Poets Socket

Natalio Hernández: Nahuatl poems / Poems in Nahuatl / In xochitl in cuicatl | Poets Socket

Natalio Hernández: Nahuatl poems / Poems in Nahuatl / In xochitl in cuicatl | Poets Socket

| Author: Poets Socket |

Poems from his poetry collection Yancuic Anahuac Cuicatl / New Canto de Anahuac (1994) Filed under: English, Natalio Hernández, Nahuatl,

I love ninequi nimiquis

I love ninequi nimiquis
ninequi niquitas yanquic tonati
ihuan yancuic tlanextli.

I love ninequi nimiquis
ninequi nicactehuas yancuic xochicuicatl
yancuic masehualcuicatl. > yancuic masehualamoxme,
ninequi niquitztehuas
yancuic tlalamiquilistli.

I love ninequi nimiquis
ninequi sampa nimoyolchicahuas
ocsepa cuali nimonelhuayotis
amo quema ninequi nitlacatehuas.

I do not want to die

I do not want to die,

I want to be part of the new day

p>

I do not want to die,

I want to enjoy the new flowery songs,

the new songs of the people.

No I want to die,

I want to read the new books

and admire the emergence

of the new wisdom.

I want to be vigorous my own life,

I long to recover my roots:

I do not want to give up my life on earth.

I do not want to die

I do not want to die,

I want to be part of the new day,

The new dawn.

I do not want to die,

I want to enjoy the new flowery songs,

I do not want to die,

I long to read the new books

and to admire the rise of a new wisdom. >

I do not want to die,

I want that I could be vigorous in my own life,

I'm eager to recover my roots:

I do not wish to give up my life on this earth.

ihuan nochi quimatl:

yeahatl huelis tech maquixtis.

Inin tlacatl tlen nochi hueli

I love burning asis:

ipampa tohuan itztoc,

Sometimes I think that Indians wait for a man

But that's all-knowing,

he'll never arrive:

tohuaya nemi toteotzitzin

tech chicahualia yaotecame

tech tlalamictia huehuetlacame.

Tinequi chicahuac timonelhuayotise

tinequi tinextise totlalamiquilis.

Ohuitoc ni tequitl

Ohuitoc ni ohtli: yancuic ohtli

ihuan yancuic tlanextli.

Xihualaca

We are not alone

p> We are not alone

The Gods walk with us

The warriors strengthen us

We receive advice from the elders.

FAUNA DE MI ARGENTINA
Its feeding is planktonic, based mainly by krill, copepods, larval states of other invertebrates like the lobster and small fish. The dive usually lasts about 4 or 5 minutes, although it can remain submerged 40 minutes in case of danger.

We want to strengthen our roots

We want to strengthen our hearts

and spread our wisdom.

The new sun and the new dawn.

In the "In Ahuehuetl / El Ahuehuete" section:

Niyectlachixtos nochi tzictzin cahuitl

niyectlachixtos se xihuilpilli,

niyectlachixtos mica xihuilpilli.

Niyolpaquis ica se ihuan se tlahtolli

ihuan nochi teotlac

nimoyolnenemilis tlen axcan,

tlen mostla ihuan huiptla tonemilis:

nichihuas se ohtli,

ohtli tlen nehuatl nonemilis.

I will live every second of my life,

I will live a century,

I will live many centuries.

I will enjoy the word

and each of the flowers;

I will recreate at dawn

and every sunset.

In the morning and the day after tomorrow,

I will trace a path:

My path, my own destiny.

ihuan iquino ocsepa

Yolli ihuan ixpolihui

(Song to Teotihuacan)

Corn is born

maize flourishes

maize ripens

maize dries.

Our heart is born

our heart flourishes

our hearts mature

our hearts die

Our cities are born

our cities flourish

p> Our cities grow old.

And everything is reborn

for vo lver to flourish.

(Tocoltzitzin Toltecame incuic)

I love burning titlamomatise tlahlamiquilistli

ihuan amo queman ticasicamatise Toltecayotl;

The Endless Poem

The Endless Poem

>

There will always be something new

or something old

to learn in life

Without time and for all time ...

Natalio Hernández was born in 1947. He is Nahua of the State of Veracruz, Mexico.

He writes poems in the Nahuatl language, with his own translations in Spanish.

In 2011 in Mexico there are still Nahuatl (the language of the Aztecs)

one and a half million people.

He is a Nahua from the State of Veracruz, Mexico, and writes in Nahuatl

and Spanish. In 2011, Nahuatl (the language of the Aztecs) is still spoken by

a million and a half Mexicans.