Aratinga jandaya - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Aratinga jandaya is a medium-sized bird of the family of parrots or parrots.

(Psittacidae). It inhabits the forested areas of northeastern Brazil.

It was discovered by the German naturalist Johann Friedrich Gmelin in 1788.

Description

The Jandaya parrot is a medium-sized parrot and long tail, approximately 30 cm long. Its head, neck and belly are orange-yellow, and its tail is green, with blue and yellow feathers. Although physically similar to Aratinga solstitialis, the Jandaya parrot can be differentiated by its fully green plumage on the wings and upper tail, in contrast to the yellow feathers of the < i> Aratinga solstitialis . The legs and beak of this bird are dark gray, and their eyes are black, surrounded by a white circle (periocular ring).

It has no sexual dimorphism, so it is difficult to differentiate the male female to the naked eye. Some researchers have noted that the female's head is smaller than the male's, but this has not been proven by reliable studies.

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The singing of the Jandaya parrot is very noisy and sharp. It does not have the high tone of the call of the solar parrot.

Reproduction The Jandaya parrot nestles in three holes, usually in a location that is at least 15 meters above the ground. In captivity, the female deposits between 3 and 6 eggs, which will have to incubate for the next 26 days, approximately. Both parents feed the chicks until they are ready to fend for themselves, at 2 months of age. Feeding

This species can live for over thirty years in captivity.

Like many species of parrots that can be kept as companion animals, Jandaya parrots stand out for their sociable and sweet disposition and their nature playful; in addition, they have great ability to learn new tricks and are suitable animals to coexist with children. They are very intelligent birds, and can learn several words and phrases, although they are not distinguished by their talking ability.

These birds need to have entertainment and interaction with their human counterparts if they are in captivity. They can suffer various diseases, such as loss of feathers or malaise typical of parrots.

With thorns ...
It is not the same a garden to the south with many hours of light and heat that a garden to the north fried and wet. I have in my garden for at least 10 years a mamillaria and a parody that live content passing cold under the snow.