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Two species of cone snail, Conus geographus (left) and Conus tulipa (right) attempting to capture their fish prey. As they approach potential prey, the snails release a specialized insulin into the water, along with neurotoxins that inhibit sensory circuits, resulting in hypoglycemic, sensory-deprived fish that are easier to engulf with their large, distensible false mouths. Once engulfed, powerful paralytic toxins are injected by the snail into each fish.Cone snails are abundant in most tropical marine waters, especially around coral reefs. Each species makes a distinct repertoire of venom compounds, mixtures that have evolved to target particular prey.

Two species of conch snails, Conus geographus (left) and Conus tulipa (right) trying to capture their prey. When approaching the potential prey, the snails release a specialized insulin in the water, along with neurotoxins that inhibit the sensorial circuits, which results in a hypoglycemic attack, inhibiting their senses and thus being easier to wrap with their large and distendible mouths. Once enveloped, potent paralyzing toxins are injected by the snail into each fish.

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Cone snails are abundant in most tropical marine waters, especially around coral reefs. Each species has a different repertoire of poisonous compounds.

Birds of Ecuador - WorldWildZoom
Additionally, we have included vocalizations for the majority of the species, completing this unique experience. The menu is organized by family, with the individual species ordered taxonomically within each.