Blog - Constanca Cabral

Blog - Constanca Cabral

Blog - Constanca Cabral

[scroll dow for English]

This morning I shared at Instagram and Facebook sunrise photograph seen from my kitchen door. It was a spontaneous sharing: I did not edit the image and I simply wrote that, for some time now, I started to lie down earlier and, consequently, I began to wake up at around 6 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. without effort and without alarm.

The reaction of those who follow me in those channels was immediate and so personal that I was thinking that maybe I should write a more detailed post on this subject.

During my 20s I was Someone to lie down late. I remember that when I had the first experience of living alone (during Erasmus in Paris), I would often go to bed at 2:00 a.m. in the morning. Later, back to my father's house, it was normal to go to bed at midnight. When I got married I changed this habit a bit because James started (and still starts) working at 8am and liked to lie down around 10 a.m. at night. But I was still too lazy to go to bed.

You are already guessing what followed ... because I had two babies and they completely changed our schedules. We went after the British (and New Zealander) regime of throwing the children at 7:00 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. (here they call it night ... it is curious how the perception of the hours changes according to the countries). They usually wake up around 7am in the morning, ideally after they have slept 12pm. We have dinner all early (there at 6:30), they go to bed and we can enjoy the serenade with calm (it must be said that all this idyllic scenery does not always happen).

So much talk to get back to the subject of bedtime early and early to rise. I need to sleep 8-9 a night. If I sleep less, the day does not pay me anything. On the other hand, I am a very introverted person and need quiet times before the confusion of the day begins. I found that waking up early and having breakfast alone, listening to the birds and reading a bit brings me great serenity and makes my day better. But for that, I really have to impose the discipline of going to bed early, ideally around 9 a.m. And believe me every night I have to overcome the resistance of going to bed ...

I know this is not an incredibly exciting subject, but I think it's important to talk about it. We live in a society of extremely stimulated and tired people. Just because we get enough sleep can radically increase our quality of life. And it's a therapy that costs no money at all!

As with everything, you do not have to be a fundamentalist. There are special nights, and it is healthy that they continue to exist. But, in my view, they should be the exception, not the rule. The truth is that in day-to-day life, we often stretch the night without gaining anything from it. If this idea of ​​facing sleep as a priority intrigues you but you think it is not for you, watch this short talk .

Juan Espinoza Cuadra Poems
The innocent die, the father, the child, the mother, the tombs abound, the executions overflow, the cities distilled into pieces. Neither Universities nor schools protect from the rain of bullets, any family is besieged by the mosquerío of decomposed bodies.

. If you do not want to hear about lectures, books, or scientific studies, simply listen to the wise voice of the people:

If you are skeptical, read The Sleep Revolution p>

Lying early and early erecting gives health and makes it grow.

People,Äôs reactions were so immediate and personal and this got me thinking that maybe I should address this topic on a more detailed blog post.

my 20s I was a bit of an owl. I remember that when I first lived all by myself (during Erasmus in Paris) I used to go to bed at 2-3am. Later, when I came back to my home, I shifted to midnight. When I got married I changed my habits again because Tiago used to (and still does) start work at 8am (in Portugal that's considered an early start), so I went to bed at around 10pm. But I still felt a strong reluctance to go to bed at that time.

I'm sure you're guessing what you eat next, yes, I had two babies and they completely shifted our schedule. We started following the British (and Kiwi) regime of putting children to bed at 7-7.30pm (this is still an absolute shocker to my Portuguese friends and family). They usually wake up around 7am, ideally after having slept 12 hours. We will have all dinner early (around 6.30), then the kids will go to bed and Tiago and I will get to spend a quiet evening together.

It goes without saying that this schedule is much easier in societies where people start and leave work early (James will typically arrive home at 5.30-6pm). I must say that having dinner before 8pm has been a revelation for me. If nothing else, my indigestion issues are much better!

I know this is not the most exciting of topics but I think it's really important one. We live in a society of people who are incredibly stimulated and exhausted. The simple fact of getting enough sleep can radically increase our quality of life. And this therapy is free!

As always, there's no need to become fundamentalist about it. There are special occasions and it's healthy that they keep on existing. But I think they should be the exception, not the norm. So we postpone our bedtime for no good reason. Just another episode - another chapter - another piece of news ...

If this idea of ​​making sleep a priority intrigues you but you believe it's not for you, check out this short talk . If you still feel sceptical, I suggest you read the book The Sleep Revolution .

Early on to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.

/ em>